There are three ways that pots are seeded with money at the beginning of the hand.

The most familiar to the home player is the “ante”, where each player tosses a small amount into the pot for the right to be dealt a hand.

The second way, often used in conjunction with an ante, is the “forced bring-in”. For example, in seven-card stud, after everyone antes and is dealt the first three cards, the player with the lowest upcard may be forced to bet to get things started.

The third way, often used in games without upcards like Hold’em or Omaha, is a “forced blind bet”. This is similar to the bring-in, but is always made by the person immediately after the player with the “button”. The “button” is a plastic disk เว็บคาสิโนออนไลน์that moves around the table and indicates which player is acting as dealer for the hand (of course, the house dealer does the actual dealing of cards, but does not play). A second or even third blind may follow the first, usually of increasing size. Whichever seed method is used, note that this initial pot, small as it is, is the only reason to play at all.

If the game has blinds, the dealer may now ask you if you want to “post”. This means, “do you want to pay extra to see a hand now, in a bad position, and then pay the blinds, or are you willing to sit and watch for a few minutes?” Answer “no, I’ll wait” and watch the game until the dealer tells you it’s time to begin, usually after the blinds pass you.

Splashing the Pot

In some home games, it is customary to throw chips directly into the pot.

In a public card-room, this is cause for dirty looks, a reprimand from the dealer, and possibly stopping the game to count down the pot.

When you bet, place your chips directly in front of you. The dealer will make sure that you have the right number and sweep them into the pot.

Your turn to play

Finally, it is your turn to get cards and play. Your first impression will probably be how fast the game seems to move.

If you are playing stud, several upcards may be “mucked” (folded into the discards) before you even see them; if you are playing hold’em, it may be your turn to act before you have looked at your cards. After a few hands you should settle into the rhythm and be able to keep up.

If you ever get confused, just ask the dealer what is going on.

When playing, consider the following elements of poker etiquette:

Acting in Turn

Although you may see others fold or call out of turn, don’t do it yourself. It is considered rude because it gives an unfair advantage to the players before you who have yet to act. This is especially important at the showdown when only three players are left.

If players after you are acting out of turn while you decide what to do, say “Time!” to make it clear that you have not yet acted.